AFOQT - Scores Explained, and What to Expect

AFOQT Scores Explained

All Air Force officer candidates, regardless of commissioning source, regardless of whether or not they want to fly, must take the AFOQT. The Air Force believes that this one test is the single best predictor of overall success in the Air Force.

In 2015, the Air Force began administering a NEW version of the AFOQT-- Form "T", instead of Form "S" or "P", with significant changes. Be sure you are preparing for the correct, updated test! Scroll down for the changes.

The current AFOQT takes nearly five hours to complete, which accounts for pre-test instructions, some paperwork, and two breaks. Calculators aren’t permitted. Here’s a breakdown of the testing time:

AFOQT Timing

Subtest

Admin Time

 

Test Time

Items

Pilot

CSO

ABM

Academic

Verbal

Quant

Pretest Activities

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Verbal Analogies (VA)

1

8

25

 

 

X

X

X

 

Arithmetic Reasoning (AR)

1

29

25

 

 

 

X

 

X

Word Knowledge (WK)

1

5

25

 

X

 

X

X

 

Math Knowledge (MK)

1

22

25

X

X

X

X

 

X

Reading Comprehension (RC)

1

38

25

 

 

 

X

X

 

Break

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Situational Judgment Test

1

35

50

 

 

 

 

 

 

Self-Description Inventory

1

45

240

 

 

 

 

 

 

Demographics

15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Break

15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pretest Activities

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Physical Science (PS)

1

10

20

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table Reading (TR)

2

7

40

X

X

X

 

 

 

Instrument Comprehension (IC)

3

5

25

X

 

X

 

 

 

Block Counting (BC)

2

4.5

30

 

X

X

 

 

 

Aviation Information (AI)

1

8

20

X

 

X

 

 

 

Collection of Materials

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total : 3:36 Testing time + 1:11 Admin and Breaks = 4:47 Total Test Time

** NOTE: Sections counting towards rated career fields are in BOLD

 

What AFOQT Composite Scores Do I Need?

 

You need this composite score:

If you want to be…

Verbal

Quant

Pilot

CSO

ABM

Any Officer

15

10

*

*

*

Pilot (incl. RPA)

15

10

25

10

*

CSO

15

10

10

25

*

ABM

15

10

*

*

25

* = no official minimum

 

How Composites are Calculated

pilotentest-instrumenten-interpretatie-7.png

Each composite score is calculated from a combination of subtest scores: for example, yourverbal composite score is a combination of yourverbal analogies, word knowledge, and reading comprehension subtest scores. Various subtests are weighted differently according to a secret formula, so one subtest may count more than another subtest in calculating individual composites (for example, reading comprehension may count more than verbal analogies in calculating the verbal composite). Your composite scores are reported back to you. You will never learn your subtest scores.

Each composite score is expressed as a percentile. It represents what percent of test-takers scored less than you did on that composite. If you score a 51, that means 51% of test-takers scored lower than you did, and 49% scored higher.  Looking at the table above, that means that pilot candidates must at a minimum score higher than 15% of test takers on verbal, 10% on quant, 25% on pilot and 10% on CSO. Most successful pilot candidates do score much higher than the minimum in each composite. For more information on pilot candidacy, see my post on How Pilot Candidates are Ranked.

Here is a summary of the subtests that contribute to each composite.

  • Pilot (MK + IC + TR + AI): This composite measures some of the knowledge and abilities considered necessary for successful completion of manned and unmanned pilot training. The Pilot composite includes subtests which measure quantitative ability, the ability to determine aircraft attitude from instruments, knowledge of aeronautical concepts, and perceptual speed. This composite is used in combination with the Test of Basic Aviation Skills (TBAS) and flying hours to determine your overall Pilot Candidate Selection Method (PCSM) score.  Pilot candidates must score at least 25 for this composite; if you’re a navigator candidate, you need to score at least 10. Pilot candidates also need a combined pilot and CSO score of at least 50.

  • CSO (VA + AR + MK + BC + TR + PS): This composite (previously called Navigator-Technical) measures some of the knowledge and abilities considered necessary for successful completion of CSO training. The CSO composite shares some subtests with the Pilot composite, with the exception that measures of an ability to determine aircraft attitude and knowledge of aeronautical concepts are not included. However, subtests are added measuring verbal aptitude and spatial ability. Pilot candidates need a minimum score of 10 for this composite; CSO candidates need a minimum score of 25. CSO candidates also need a combined pilot and CSO score of at least 50.

  • ABM ( VA + WK + TR + IC + BC + AI): This composite measures some of the knowledge and abilities considered necessary for successful completion of ABM training. The ABM composite shares some subtests with the Pilot composite, including measures of an ability to determine aircraft attitude, knowledge of aeronautical concepts, perceptual speed, and quantitative ability. However, like the CSO composite, subtests are added measuring verbal aptitude and spatial ability. ABM candidates need a minimum score of 25 in this composite.

  • Academic aptitude (VA + AR + WK + MK): This score looks at verbal and quantitative knowledge — important aspects of your military officer career. Good news: You don’t need a particular minimum score for this composite.

  • Verbal (VA + WK + RC): This composite measures verbal knowledge and abilities. The combined subtest determines your ability to reason, understand synonyms, and recognize relationships between words. All officer candidates must have a minimum score of 15.

  • Quantitative (AR + MK): This grouping measures your math-related abilities and knowledge. All officer candidates must achieve a minimum score of 10.

  • Situational Judgment (SJ): This composite measures judgment and decision-making in responding to the types of interpersonal situations often encountered by junior USAF officers.

Form T Changes

In 2015, the Air Force began administering a NEW version of the AFOQT-- Form "T", instead of Form "S", with significant changes as follows:

  • No more Hidden Figures or Rotated Blocks!!
  • A Reading Comprehension subtest was added.
  • Situational Judgment was added as its own composite.
  • Instrument Comprehension was updated with enhanced graphics based on modern aircraft.
  • General Science was revised with a focus on the physical sciences and was therefore renamed to Physical Science.

 

Questions? I can help.

Source:  AFOQT Form T Official Pamphlet (updated Aug 2015)